FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

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WHAT IS CHIROPRACTIC CARE?

A chiropractor is a member of a regulated health profession, regulated by the College of Chiropractors of Ontario (CCO) under the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991. In order for anyone to practise as a chiropractor or use the title of “chiropractor” in Ontario, an individual must meet the registration requirements of CCO. These requirements include graduation from an accredited chiropractic college, successful completion of clinical competency and legislation and ethics examinations, and completion of an application for registration with CCO. Doctors of chiropractic complete a minimum of 7 years of post-secondary education before becoming registered with CCO. As well, as part of being a member of a self-regulated health profession, chiropractors are required to participate in life-long learning, which includes continuing education and professional development, self-assessment and peer and practice assessment.


Chiropractors are authorized to use the “Doctor” title in providing patient care and communicate a diagnosis within the chiropractic scope of practice.


(College of Chiropractors of Ontario)

DO I NEED A DOCTOR’S REFERRAL?

In Ontario, you can visit a chiropractor without a referral from a doctor, nurse practitioner or other health care professional. 

(Ontario Chiropractic Association)

WHAT CONDITIONS DO YOU TREAT?

There are many reasons to seek Chiropractic Care including:

  • Joint pain or limited range of motion (Neck, Back, Shoulder, or limbs)

  • Headaches

  • Frozen Shoulder

  • Rotator Cuff injuries 

  • Whiplash

  • Strains and sprains

  • Work and sports injuries

  • Plantar Fasciitis 

  • Arthritis

  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

  • General health and well-being

  • AND MORE!

WHAT CAN I EXPECT DURING MY FIRST VISIT?

During your first visit to your chiropractor, I will ask questions and perform tests to better understand your current health, as well as your spine, muscles, joints or nervous system issues.

Set aside approximately 30 to 60 minutes for your first visit to your chiropractor. Each subsequent visit may be as short as 15 minutes. The length of your appointments may also vary depending on where you live and the size of the clinic. So it’s a good idea to ask about timing when you book the appointment.


Wear comfortable clothes and if you have an X-ray or other test results, please bring them with you.

(Ontario Chiropractic Association)

WHAT IS A CHIROPRACTIC ADJUSTMENT?

One of the most frequent treatments a chiropractor uses is manual manipulation of the vertebrae of your spine or other joints, which is called an ‘adjustment.’ To perform an adjustment, your chiropractor will use their hands to apply controlled force to your joint and guide it through a range of motion. This action restores your joint’s natural movement and improves its function.

When applied to your spine, this treatment is called spinal manipulation therapy (SMT). Manipulation is also used on other joints, such as those in your wrist, ankle or foot, as an effective treatment.

(Ontario Chiropractic Association)

IS CHIROPRACTIC CARE COVERED BY OHIP?

Chiropractic care is not covered by the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP). However, you, like many Ontarians, may have an extended health care (EHC) group plan. This is a plan that your employer, union, trade or professional organization has set up as part of your workplace benefits package. If you’re self-employed, you can purchase an individual EHC plan from various health care insurance providers.

(Ontario Chiropractic Association)

IS CHIROPRACTIC EFFECTIVE?

Reduced Medication and Opioid Use

  • A 2019 U.S. study found that 64 per cent of patients who saw a chiropractor were less likely to use opioids than people who didn’t, as reported in the journal Pain Medicine

  • 83 per cent of patients surveyed now rely less on medication, including opioids, to help manage their low back pain, after receiving care from a musculoskeletal (spine, muscle or joint) expert, such as a chiropractor, at one of Ontario’s government-funded Primary Care Low Back Pain program sites.

  • 2017 Canadian Guideline for Opioid Therapy and Chronic Non-Cancer Pain recommends therapies without medication, such as spinal or joint manipulation and therapeutic exercise, for treating back pain, as well as neck pain, knee osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia and severe headaches or migraines.

 

Pain Relief

 

(Ontario Chiropractic Association)